What Should I Know Before I Float?

#1. Floating is an experience that differs from person to person and from float to float.

This is NOT a hot tub. It is a place for being still, allowing time for the body to do nothing but relax and recuperate, and for exploring Inner Space.

In a very real sense, you need to learn how to float – to discover what works for you, and how to get the most from your session. It generally takes two or three floats to accomplish this.

Be open and discover this new experience.

Some floaters who are prone to motion sickness sometimes report feeling queasy. This feeling usually passes quickly and often does not return in later floats. Perhaps it is the body reacting to the feeling of floating and the lack of the regular feeling that gravity gives us of “up” and  “down.”  Some ginger candies or ginger tea is our recommended remedy.

 

#2. There are some things you need to do, and some things you need NOT to do before a float.

Note:
All float sessions start and end together and include 90 minutes in the rooms. Please arrive fifteen minutes before your scheduled time so that there is enough time for explanations, questions, and paperwork before the scheduled start time, especially if this is your first float.

DO:

  • Avoid caffeine and large meals for about two hours before a float.
  • Shut off your cell phone – or leave it in the car.
  • Allow two hours for your float session, and preferably nothing demanding afterwards.
  • Use the restroom before you go to your float room.
  • Remove your contact lenses!

DON’T:

  • Don’t float if you have cuts or sores – the salt is very uncomfortable on broken skin.
  • Don’t float if you have used any temporary hair color or henna within the last ten days or if your color comes out in the shower!!
  • Don’t float if you have a new tattoo.
  • Don’t float if you have consumed alcohol or drugs.
  • Do not leave any bodily fluids of any kind in the tank! You will pay up to a $1,000.00 fee if the tank must be drained, sanitized and refilled with salt. It’s clean when you get in; it must be the same when you leave.